Taking an Agnostic Approach to Legal Technology

By |2021-02-03T20:01:24+00:00February 3rd, 2021|Categories: Data, eDiscovery, Information Governance, Intelligence, Technology|

Early on in my career as a consultant in the eDiscovery space, I felt it important to have an agnostic approach and be independent with my recommendations for solutions, technologies, and providers. Even in my earliest days running the advisory practice at Renew Data where we had our own technology and service offering, there were many situations where I advised clients to go another direction because of the specific scope of a project. As much as this frustrated our salespeople, I understood that there is plenty of business out there and it was good karma.   In 2010 Barry Murphy, Greg Buckles, and I founded the eDJ Group, a boutique analyst firm covering the electronic discovery and information governance space. The eDJ Group stayed above the fray at all cost looking at what was really in the best interest of a client based on their specific scenarios. We tried our best as analysts to take an agnostic approach.  I founded the eDiscovery Advisory practice on the same agnostic approach to technology and providers. That means passing up the lucrative referral or sales relationships with technology and service providers that pervade our market. Maintaining the integrity to advise clients based on their needs is key to the eDiscovery Teams strategic vision and achieving our desired state of KinDato (Knowledge and Intelligence through Data).  As the eDiscovery Advisory team continues to build on this agnostic approach, I had the opportunity to reunite with my previous business partner and very independent consultant, Greg Buckles.  Greg still runs the eDiscovery Journal as well as the eDJ Group consulting practice.    JV: You and I have spoken many times over our careers about really taking more of an agnostic approach to looking at legal technology and legal service providers. Maybe we could start at the beginning by sharing why you chose to be independent and your experiences working independently.  GB: In my role as a corporate buyer of eDiscovery technology and services at El Paso Corp., I started finding conflicts inherent within the relationships between my service and tech providers. I would find out they would get points off a deal or if I chose a piece of technology, the sales rep would get 7.5%.    When I went from there to being a product manager, everybody around me was selling technology except for me. I was the person who owned the development of the technology, [...]